Was Any Or Were Any?

Are there some or any?

Generally, we use any in the same way as some: when we are thinking about a certain amount or number of something.

Remember, usually both some and any can only be used with plural countable nouns or uncountable nouns, but not usually with singular countable nouns..

Do I use was or were?

Generally, “was is used for singular objects and “were” is used for plural objects. So, you will use “was” with I, he, she and it while you will use “were” with you, we and they. There is a tip you might want to consider. Even though you are singular, you must use “were”.

What is the word were?

Meaning – Were is the past tense of the verb are. … Since were means the same as the past tense of are in this sentence, it is the correct word to use. SUGGESTION: To test whether were is the correct word to use in a sentence, see if you can use are in its place, putting the sentence into the present tense.

Is Tea plural or singular?

The noun tea can be countable or uncountable. In more general, commonly used, contexts, the plural form will also be tea. However, in more specific contexts, the plural form can also be teas e.g. in reference to various types of teas or a collection of teas.

How do you use any in a sentence?

In general, any is used in negative sentences and questions:I didn’t get any nice presents for Christmas this year.I looked in the cupboard but I couldn’t find any biscuits.I don’t need any help.She’s so rude. … I don’t have anything to wear to the dance.I’m not hungry. … Do you have any brothers or sisters?More items…

Where do we use any?

The general rule is that any is used for questions and negatives while some is used for positive. Both may be used with countable and uncountable nouns. Do we need any rice? No, we don’t need any rice.

Was any VS were any?

Forms of Was and Were As I said above, was and were are in the past tense, but they are used differently. Was is used in the first person singular (I) and the third person singular (he, she, it). Were is used in the second person singular and plural (you, your, yours) and first and third person plural (we, they).

Is any considered singular or plural?

“Any” is usually singular, but sometimes it’s plural, depending on how it’s used. My response was supposed to suggest that the sentence was not particularly good because we don’t know what the any is referring to — something countable or not.

Has any or have any grammar?

The correct form should be ‘have any of you’ as you is in plural form. ‘Any one of you’ is different. Any one, meaning ‘any single (person or thing),’ is written as two words to emphasize singularity: any one of us could do the job; not more than ten new members are chosen in any one year.

Can plural come after any?

In “English Grammar” (David Daniels & Barbara Daniels, ISBN 0-06-467109-7), any is listed between the pronouns that can be either plural or singular, among all, more, and some.

Could I have a glass of water please?

But the ‘permission’ use of can is not in fact incorrect in standard English. The only difference between the two verbs is that one is more polite than the other. In informal contexts it’s perfectly acceptable to use can; in formal situations it would be better to use may. May I have a glass of water, please?